The community tool shed

Down at the allotments we have a community tool shed which we open Wednesday and Sunday mornings. Today it was my turn to open up the shed.

Allotments in the UK tend to be rather large, but at Beelarong community farm each plot is eight square metres. No room to put a shed on that pocket handkerchief – hence the community shed, where tools and equipment are made available for any allotment holder to use.

Most of us keep our own gardening tools in the boot, but not many of us can fit a wheelbarrow in the back seat!  That’s where the community shed comes into it’s own.

Once I’d opened up the shed I checked on my allotment. The ground was lovely, thanks to some recent rain, and it was a pleasure to just admire my veggies – and pick them.  The silver beet (chard) has done really well this year, and the Cavalo Nero kale is looking wonderful, no caterpillar damage which I’m very happy about. One year the cabbage moth devastated the whole lot.  I picked more broccolini from my broccoli plants – just turned my back for a few days – those plants can’t help themselves.

The flat leafed parsley seems to be fashionable now but I prefer to grow the curly parsley – I love the rich green of the leaves – and I don’t know what it’s roots are sitting in but whatever it is, that parsley is revelling in it. So I just keep hacking away at it and pass a bunch of it on to anybody who wants some.

Curly parsley

Curly parsley.

I picked a couple of Kohlrabi to chop up and put in the savoury mince I cooked when I got home. (A whole lot of veggies went into the pot, I tend to get carried away, so if the army turn up on my doorstep I’ll be able to feed them all.)

I digress.  I had some time to kill before it was time for me to lock the shed up so I took the camera out. I bought a really nice camera ages ago but haven’t used it much because I haven’t mastered it.  So today I took the instruction book with me and practised with the macro lens.

DSCN0913

This lovely little lettuce is no more. I enjoyed it with my lunchtime salad.

DSCN0915

A daisy to attract the bees

DSCN0921

This is my Cavalo Nero kale, you can tell just by looking at it that it’s full of minerals. These leaves were chopped up and added to my savoury mince in the last few minutes of cooking. I’ll have muscles like Popeye.

DSCN0924

I thought this was pretty. It’s one of my spring onions gone to seed.

I’ve got a way to go with the camera. But you have to start somewhere. I really could use a few lessons.

The real reason behind my dusting off the camera is reading Mr Tootlepedal’s blog – his photos of birds and flowers are amazing. I’ll never reach those dizzy heights.

Happy gardening.

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6 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Kathy
    Sep 28, 2014 @ 23:39:58

    The community tool shed is a great idea. Speaking of wheelbarrows last year my friend won a wheelbarrow full of grog at the Samford Show it was a raffle. Problem was how do you get the wheelbarrow home…the grog was no problem. Regards Kathy A, Brisbane

    Reply

  2. narf77
    Sep 29, 2014 @ 03:47:56

    Your vegetables look amazing Jean. I find it amazing that we are just about to start planting these same veggies for our summer period and you will be winding down and we live in the same country! I think that the community shed is a winning idea. Giving people access to wheelbarrows etc. gets them motivated to get stuck in and garden. Your photos are lovely and like everything else, the more you practice, the better you will get. Believe Steve, he was a guitar teacher 😉

    Reply

  3. Allotment adventures with Jean
    Sep 29, 2014 @ 07:45:41

    Thank you Narf. This is the third year I’ve had the same allotment and I have been feeding the soil with anything I can get my hands on, especially from the horse paddock next door.
    I’m lucky to have my little patch at a community farm where I don’t have to own every gardening tool. I borrow.
    I’ll work my way through the bells and whistles on the camera.

    Reply

  4. tootlepedal
    Sep 29, 2014 @ 08:23:19

    Thank you for the flattering reference. You will find as I did no doubt, that practice makes if not perfect then at least quite a bit better. I am greatly helped by having Mrs Tootlepedal’s flowers to work with.

    Reply

  5. MrsYub
    Oct 03, 2014 @ 07:59:27

    That kale looks amazing! Mine are all going to seed now, but I might have to hunt that one down and give it a go!
    I have both flat and curly parsley at the moment, but I’m picking it and dehydrating it as fast as I can make time for as it’s all trying to go to seed, too!
    Another batch of lovely photos! I enjoyed them all. Thankyou for sharing 🙂

    Reply

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