Growing potatoes in bags

When I went out to the allotment yesterday I was really pleased to see how my potatoes are coming along.  My daughter-in-law first introduced me to the idea of growing my spuds in these bags rather than in the ground – she got them from Green Harvest.

3 potato plants in this potato growing bag

The beauty of these particular bags is that there is a flap on the side of each bag, held with velcro, that you can open up when you are ready to harvest. By opening the flap you can firstly check whether the potatoes are ready, but it also gives you the opportunity of ‘bandicooting’. If you havn’t come across this expression before it just means you can take a few potatoes from the bag without disturbing the rest of the plant as it keeps growing. Clever eh?

I got googling and found another Australian company Garden Express that also stocks these bags and if you click on the link there is a photograph of the bag with a side-on view that shows you the flap I was talking about.

I am using three bags, 9 plants in all. Not a lot, but as I only have 16 square metres at the allotment space is at a premium. I am hoping that by using the bags they will take up less room and the big advantage as I see it is that none of the harvest will be lost as you just empty the bags into a wheelbarrow, or onto a tarpaulin, and you have the whole crop, nothing left in the ground.

I’ll keep topping up the compost in the bags until I reach the top of the bag and see what sort of harvest I get.

Watch this space!

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12 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Edwina Fulton
    Aug 20, 2012 @ 23:19:15

    I have a couple of bags like these only thy are a dark green colour. Got them from the Homecare Catalogue around $20 each.

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Aug 21, 2012 @ 05:47:14

      Hi Edwina. Thank you for visiting. I would love to hear how you got on with your green bags. Did you get a good harvest, or havn’t you used them yet?

      Reply

      • Edwina Fulton
        Aug 21, 2012 @ 21:41:15

        Last year we had so much rain that every root crop in the garden got waterlogged turned to muck, so no, didn’t do very well at all. Hopefully, this year they should be good. Will let you know. Just planted them last week.

  2. Heidi @ lightlycrunchy
    Aug 21, 2012 @ 02:45:53

    What a cool idea – and a great way to grow potatoes in limited space. Much easier than hilling them. Though I can’t avoid the hilling thing – we have 6 rows of them in the ground.

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Aug 21, 2012 @ 05:44:16

      Hello Heidi. I envy your six rows of potatoes. If you are feeding a family then that would be more practical (and cheaper!) than using the bags. I enjoyed reading your comment – I thought I was too old to be ‘cool’. Made me chuckle.

      Reply

  3. Deb
    Aug 21, 2012 @ 18:53:04

    Hi Jean, Thanks for your lovely compliments about my pictures. Yes my iphone pics are just plain snapping although I use an couple of apps instagram and hipstamatic on occasions. Most of my photos are taken with a Panasonic Lumix FZ100. I am just learning, for example I don’t understand what all the setting on my camera are for. Most of my pictures are taken with the camera on auto. I don’t belong to a group but I would like to if there were any closeby, however I do take ,lots of pictures and look for interesting subjects and perspectives. May I suggest that you join in my photo scavenger hunt and get started on getting your iphone out and seeing what you can do (if you don’t have another digital camera.) All info is here. http://primrosehappysnapper.blogspot.com.au/p/join-me-for-photographic-scavenger-hunt.html
    I would love to have you, as its all about sharing and learning as we go. I see you have a blog (just my kind of blog as I am into simple living myself) so you could share on there.

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Aug 22, 2012 @ 15:58:48

      Hi Deb. Thank you so much for all this information on your Panasonic camera, and notes about instagram and hipstamatic which I’ll check out. It has been really helpful (and encouraging). I will certainly join in the photo scavenger hunt, a good way to get me started.

      Reply

  4. narf77
    Aug 21, 2012 @ 19:02:46

    That is exactly what we are going to do with our kipfler’s Jean! Amazing…great minds think alike et al 🙂 Can’t wait to empty our bags into our wheelbarrow and revel in the kipfler harvest. Might even plant some purple ones as well as my last lot were lacklustre to say the very least lol 😉

    Reply

  5. Shannon
    Aug 22, 2012 @ 20:33:18

    Wow, those bags are really cool. I currently grow potatoes in the ground, and I am always leaving some behind accidentally at harvest time. Sometimes it’s the following Spring before I realize it. I had 42 potato plants this year, definitely too much to bag them all, but it might be worthwhile for me to get one and try it if you can grow three plants at a time in it. I wonder if you could grow potatoes indoors in the bag in a sunny window? Hmmn… They also might make a good option for growing potatoes in a greenhouse, which I had kind of figured I would not be able to do. Thanks for the info!

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Aug 23, 2012 @ 07:58:22

      Hi Shannon, thank you for visiting. I agree that really these potato bags are for small spaces. Or if you are just feeding one person. With 42 potato plants they would have to go in the ground, but as you say, it’s hard then to find all when you harvest. I’m not sure about the sunny window sill as there are drainage holes in the bottom of the bags. Could make a bit of a mess down your kitchen wall! He he. It would be interesting to try them in the greenhouse. I bought the special potato bags with the ‘door’ in the side, but really any large plastic bin would do, just as long as you have drainage holes.

      Reply

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