An action packed weekend

The weekend just flew by and it’s only now that I have found the quiet time to sit and blog about it.

I went to Jan Powers’ Farmers’ Market over at The Powerhouse, New Farm Park on Saturday morning.  I grabbed my ‘Nanny Trolley’ and set off. The market was buzzing with folk out to enjoy a lovely sunny morning after all the rain we have had.

“Nanny Trolley”

I am lucky that I grow most of my own vegetables but there is still produce I need to stock up on. On the list I had eggs, avocado, tomatoes, a whole pumpkin (such good value at the moment) and enough new season strawberries and rhubarb to make jam.

I parked the car over near the library and strolled through the park, stopping on the way for a take-away coffee from the kiosk. As I was waiting for the barista to work his magic I noticed this lovely palm. Sorry I cannot name it, perhaps someone can help there.  Thanks to the passer-by for taking this photo.

Palm in New Farm Park

After strolling through the markets it was then time to retrace my steps across the park to New Farm library where Brisbane horticulturist Annette McFarlane was giving a workshop on vegetable growing, funded by Brisbane City Council.  I have been to quite a few of Annette’s presentations in the past. As well as being so knowledgeable, she is also an entertaining speaker.

Then I went home to make jam. A satisfying day all round.

Sunday morning was computer training over at the Apple Showroom at Chermside with trainers Jacob and Kim.

Onto coffee with son number one.

A quick sandwich and then it was off to the allotment. Always a good social time on Sundays as people who cannot make it during the week catch up with the gardening.  I seem to spend more time leaning on my fork on Sundays, yarning. But that’s good too as I learn so much and, just occasionally, hand out my pearls of wisdom.

An allotment neighbour had an abundance of lettuce and kale plants and generously passed some on to me. (She must have scattered the seed around in gay abandon – she could keep Brisbane in lettuces!). But we all get a bit carried away sometimes and cannot bare to destroy any of these precious seedlings.

One thing I had learned from Annette McFarlane’s talk the day before was that I was basically starving my vegetables. Evidently you should be able to grow a lettuce in six weeks.  Six Weeks! My last sowing of lettuce was six weeks old and still only two inches tall (in the old money!).  So even though I thought I had fed the soil – obviously not enough – I went out with the liquid feed and watered it in like mad. Willing them to grow.

Fortunately the secretary from the local Pony Club made a visit this week and has offered us pony poo. So that is the way to go I reckon.  Six weeks Annette? – just you wait I’ll have those lettuces popping up in five.

Finally I dug up some potatoes for dinner. Here they are. And they were delicious.

‘Nicola’ potatoes for Sunday dinner

Have a good week.

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5 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Jode
    Jul 17, 2012 @ 13:25:29

    What a lovely weekend! We used to have those palms when i was living on the Gold Coast…i can’t for the life of me remember the name now (i think because we always just called them the fan palms lol!)It will come to me!! I do miss just strolling through the Farmers markets….a little too hectic now with the twins wanting to go in all directions i’m afraid!
    That workshop sounds fantastic, i enjoy her too…and also a computer class …my you are a busy lady! I just love the community feel of your allotment…all that chatting and sharing of produce! I need to feed my lettuce and crops too…it’s one of those jobs always on my list but never happens with regularity!
    I so enjoyed reading about your weekend..thanks for sharing x

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Jul 17, 2012 @ 18:30:40

      Thank you for visiting Jode and for your kind words. Let us not worry about the Latin name. From now on I am going to call them “fan palms” as that describes them beautifully.

      I know what you mean about trying to do a farmers market with little ones. When my boys were small I probably wouldn’t have attempted it either. When my second son was little it was the sewing machine, the needle going up and down was too tempting for his little fingers and I put the machine away for a while.

      I’m retired now, and have the time to pursue lots of interests, and I love it. But I wouldn’t have missed those precious years when I raised my boys for all the tea in China.

      “Beelarong Community Garden” where I have my allotment is rather special to my mind. I have been fortunate to fine a group of really lovely people.

      I do enjoy reading your blog and all the things that are happening with your family. I especially admire the way you encourage the twins to be so creative. Your older daughter is delightful, the twins must be thrilled to have a ‘big sister’.

      Reply

      • Jode
        Jul 21, 2012 @ 21:51:40

        Fan palms always worked for me!! They are lovely though! The sewing machine here is a bit of a struggle at the moment too…it can sit on the kitchen table for weeks as i get little bits done ever so slowly! You seem to be making the most of retirement…i really admire that, must be lovely to pursue all those interests!
        Thank you for your lovely words about my blog and the girls….i often wonder whether our little family adventures are at all interesting but words like yours help me see a bigger picture….hope you have a lovely weekend x

  2. narf77
    Jul 19, 2012 @ 07:39:16

    What a full, interesting and productive life you lead Jean! You make me envious. I wish we had similar places for people to meet here in Tasmania. Perhaps it is something that we could get started at some time in the future. Cheers for sharing your wonderful life with us and you look positively elegant next to that (most probably) Brahea armata (Silver fan palm) or Brahea edulis (Blue Hesper Palm). 🙂

    Reply

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