Throw it a kiss and say g’day and walk away

I’m used to cane toads and ticks over at the allotment, this is Queensland after all. To complete the trilogy we now have a snake.

When I was at the farm the other day we found a Black Whip Snake when we were rolling the tumblers.  It was under a compost tumbler and was trying to desperately get away when disturbed.  Dan who was there when it was discovered has some bush experience and was able to identify it. It has a very large eye, body and tail long and slender. Rich brown above, spotted with black and flecked with white: small dark blotches on top of head; belly green grey.  It can grow to 1.5m and is potentially dangerous but not neuro-toxic. See further reference on Page 204 of “Wildlife of Greater Brisbane”.

We have been advised of the action to be taken – be aware but not alarmed. Take care when moving tin or boxes on the ground.  Move objects with a rake handle first just in case a snake is sheltering underneath.  Walk heavily in long grass or bush.  Snakes will always try to get away.  Laminated first-aid prints are distributed in prominent positions around the farm. Don’t forget to wear closed in boots and if bitten apply first-aid and seek medical attention. A first-aid kit is supplied.

******

I’ve been doing a big of googling about snakes in Australia and I just love this comment by Rural Reporter Brooke Neindorf on the ABC website  –  check out the last sentence  “Australia has lots of venomous snakes. They cause few problems to sensible people [and] left alone they just go about their business.”  “Just throw it a kiss and say g’day and walk away, that’s what I reckon.”

I must remember that ……  I’m sure it will help.

Happy gardening.

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16 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. christiok
    Dec 06, 2012 @ 14:48:14

    Good advice for all kinds of snakes in life, I’d say. 😉

    Reply

  2. livingsimplyfree
    Dec 06, 2012 @ 16:12:41

    I am so lucky here, I live in a pocket where there are no poisonous snakes. A few can get aggressive if you pick them up but worst thing that can happen is some soreness if you get bit. I love snakes, and luckily haven’t been bitten yet. Be safe!!!

    Reply

  3. MrsYub
    Dec 06, 2012 @ 17:14:57

    Not alarmed?! Yes, I advise it, but I have this snake phobia thingy where my legs react before my head does 😦

    Reply

  4. digginwivdebb
    Dec 06, 2012 @ 17:45:06

    Snakes!! Wow! Some folk in the UK are petrified of frogs but you have snakes to deal with! Stay safe and blow them a kiss on their way.

    Reply

  5. narf77
    Dec 07, 2012 @ 03:32:36

    Right there with you Jean! We are waiting for our own Mr Snaky to turn up again. We got a large tiger snake that used to come right up to the door a few years ago but we removed all of the potted plants next to the house because according to the snake guy that we got to come and remove him (who failed…but still got paid 😦 ) he was coming for the cool and the water. Steve whipper snips the area around the house to make it less attractive for him and so long as he respects our personal space, he can have his own personal space. Besides, he can find those hidden egg stashes before they explode! 😉

    Reply

  6. notjustgreenfingers
    Dec 08, 2012 @ 16:36:31

    OMG! (As my daughters would say). I have a real phobia about snakes and I can’t even look at one without my knees going weak. Give me rats, mice, spiders or anything else and I’m fine…but not snakes. I would be just like Mrs Yub and I would be frozen to the spot!

    I obviously live in the right country, if I found a snake at my allotment, I know I would struggle to go back.

    You are very brave Jean

    Reply

  7. Susan
    Dec 18, 2012 @ 22:16:42

    Hi Jean, yep, that’s very good advice … love how it was put.
    I’m always a bit wary of snakes at this time of year, don’t let my guard down but, fortunately (touch wood), haven’t encountered any yet :D)
    Have a very Merry Christmas won’t you, cheerio for now, Susan :D)

    Reply

  8. Anna B
    Dec 22, 2012 @ 00:12:16

    My husband would love it where you live! He adores snakes and if we see a frog or toad in our garden he has grabbed it and is talking to it within minutes! We were on holiday in Borneo a few years back and met a couple from Australia who pretty much said that he would love it there. Maybe in a few years we will visit Australia. Adam will have to learn which snakes are poisonous though because he wouldn’t want to blow a kiss, he would want to give the snake an actual kiss!!! Cool post Jean 🙂

    Reply

  9. Allotment Plot 4
    Dec 22, 2012 @ 00:47:54

    And I complain about wild rabbits helping themselves to the allotment veggies! I don’t think I will again after reading your post! Happy Christmas Jean, all the best for a great growing season x

    Reply

  10. notjustgreenfingers
    Dec 22, 2012 @ 17:17:08

    Just wanted to stop by and say “Merry Christmas to you and your family and all of your readers”

    Reply

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Jerry Coleby-Williams

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