Cucumbers – Bread and Butter Pickle

This warm weather is really bringing the cucumbers on. I staked them but they seem to prefer running across the ground. So I’ll let them.

This is what I harvested today.

It’s enough for me to make my first batch of Bread and Butter Pickle of the season.

Here is the link to the recipe that I use. It also gives you a picture of the finished product.

The first step is salting and  slicing the cucumbers and onion to sit in the fridge overnight.

They’ll be bottled in the pickling vinegar tomorrow.

Happy gardening.

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21 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. MrsYub
    Nov 28, 2012 @ 19:08:13

    Ooooh! That looks nice!

    Reply

  2. Heidi @ lightlycrunchy
    Nov 28, 2012 @ 21:44:26

    I always make sour pickles, but my husband has been asking for bread and butter pickles. I guess next year I’ll have to make some too.

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Nov 29, 2012 @ 09:53:59

      Hello Heidi. Sour pickles? That sounds interesting, something else for me to google! I’ve just finished putting the pickles in the jars this morning. I have only started doing bread and butter pickles since I’ve been gardening on my allotment in Brisbane as cucumbers seem to grow easily in this climate without much looking after. I think B&B pickles are worth doing. So cheap if you grow your own veggies, and really nice on a cheese sandwich.

      Reply

  3. Anna B
    Nov 28, 2012 @ 22:42:17

    Your cucumbers look great! I love the nice sticks and mesh you’ve used. I think I will try that next year…yes I have to wait until spring to grow some! So cool following your adventures 🙂

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Nov 29, 2012 @ 09:51:07

      Thank you for your lovely comment Anna B. The sticks and mesh were filched from around the farm, behind sheds and up dark corners. Nothing goes to waste. It does make for rather a ‘creative’ structure of course. As I mentioned though, despite my giving the plants lovely support, they are running across the ground with abandon.

      Reply

  4. plotcraft
    Nov 28, 2012 @ 23:12:51

    Wow, they look good. The perfect size for pickling.

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Nov 29, 2012 @ 09:48:08

      Thank you Plotcraft. I’ve just finished pickling them and they are sitting in jars on the kitchen bench cooling down. I’ll take a photo when I’ve put the labels on and hope that the pic lives up to your (and my) expectations!

      Reply

  5. livingsimplyfree
    Nov 29, 2012 @ 04:48:39

    I used to love any kind of pickle until my grandmother introduced me to her 15 day bread and butter pickles. Now I won’t eat anything else, which means I don’t eat pickles as I haven’t taken the time to make my own batches. Maybe next year….

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Nov 29, 2012 @ 09:46:44

      Hi Living Simply Free, now that is interesting, I’ve never heard of the 15 day bread and butter pickles. When I’ve responded to today’s comments I’m going to have to get googling to see what I can find out about it. I understand there are times in our life when preserving is at the bottom of the list (to preserve our sanity!) but I’m retired now and I can pickle without getting into a pickle.

      Reply

      • livingsimplyfree
        Nov 29, 2012 @ 11:14:24

        Lol. The 15 day pickles, while time consuming are so worth it. Some days there is nothing to do but rinse, other days there is some heating as well. I would give you the recipe, but unfortunately I lost it in a house fire in 2001. I keep telling myself to go online and get it, but then I would have no reason to put off making them.

      • Allotment adventures with Jean
        Nov 29, 2012 @ 12:54:28

        I’ve been googling and have found a number of 14 day pickles which may be similar to the ones you remember.

  6. Anna B
    Nov 29, 2012 @ 07:25:58

    Hello again Jean – I’m still in love with your cucumber growing style! I’ve just shown my husband and we have vowed to grow them in a line like you next year!!! Ours will be in the greenhouse though because we don’t have your lovely weather. Thanks for sharing the inspiration! 🙂

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Nov 29, 2012 @ 09:42:28

      Hi Anna B. It’s only a little line of three plants, not sure how many you and your husband plan to line up next year! I know that three plants will provide as much as I can deal with and share. We had a really good downpour of rain last night, the temperature will be over 30 degrees today and those two events will probably give me another decent picking by tomorrow. Make hay while the sun shines (and before the pests get at them).

      Reply

  7. The Gardening Shoe (@gardeningshoe1)
    Nov 29, 2012 @ 07:40:44

    Those are the most tidy cukes I’ve ever seen! I love bread and butter pickles… they’re a proper taste of summer.

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Nov 29, 2012 @ 09:35:45

      Thank you for visiting Gardening Shoe. I’m looking forward to checking out your blog. The cukes were a bit tidy weren’t they. Unlike the curly one I picked last time I visited the allotment. I’ve just pickled the cukes and put them into their jars. I’ll be taking a photo shortly when the jars cool down enough to put the labels on.

      Reply

  8. narf77
    Nov 30, 2012 @ 03:17:17

    You are so far ahead of us here Jean! My little cucumbers are just showing signs of liking where I planted them and setting roots down to grow and here you are already harvesting yours and using them for something! At least you get something out of your garden for Christmas. I might be lucky to get a few cherry tomatoes and a lettuce or two but I have a garden patch full of full blown mushrooms thanks to using mushroom compost to top dress the beds so I guess it can’t be all bad 😉

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Nov 30, 2012 @ 06:28:41

      Hi again Fran. I thought Tassie had a good cherry harvest around Christmas. I seem to remember they are quite delicious. An abundance of mushrooms sounds wonderful. Get those mushy recipes out, or just stick them in a pan with some butter. Yum.

      Reply

  9. Trackback: Preserve your harvest « Allotment Adventures with Jean
  10. The Earth Mama
    Jul 03, 2013 @ 08:23:37

    I’m going to make these. Thanks for sharing the recipe

    Reply

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