Pests and diseases

Linda Brennan gave a great workshop at the farm this morning about organic gardening. We spent an hour walking round while Linda honed in on the pests and diseases that were attacking our vegetables. She then told us how we could deal with them organically.

She also covered ways to improve the fertility and health of our soil.  Linda packed so much information in just one and a half hours.  Next Monday she will be back with another workshop “Fruit in Pots”.

We waste no opportunity over at the farm to put the kettle on, and today was no exception as we sat around  after the workshop drinking tea and chatting. Nobody was in a hurry to move off.

Then, in a wild burst of enthusiasm after the workshop, I went over to my allotment and spent a fascinating (my tongue is in my cheek) time pinching off caterpillars and 28-spotted ladybirds.

I think ladybirds are the cutest thing and it’s a revelation to me that there is actually a ladybird that causes so much damage to my leaf vegetables. They were having a wild old time on one of my potato plants sucking and chewing and munching and whatever else they do on their path of destruction!

I like to end on a happy note so I took the camera out and captured this sunflower growing in Lindell and Andy’s allotment next to mine. The birds are going to love those seeds when the sunflower matures.

Happy gardening.

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8 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. sarah @ gladys in the garden
    Oct 08, 2012 @ 21:07:13

    It would have been very interesting.
    Oh dear, I always thought ladybirds were good insects. That’s a shame, they are very pretty.
    x

    Reply

  2. Nigel
    Oct 08, 2012 @ 21:10:53

    Ladybird and destruction. Two words I never expected to see in the same sentence. Still one garderner’s destruction is another ladybird’s lunch.

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      Oct 08, 2012 @ 21:18:27

      Hi Nigel, as I just pointed out to Sarah – it’s only the dreaded 28-spotted variety (and we are blessed with them in Brisbane) that cause the damage.
      I laughed out loud at your final comment. I am not growing potatoes to lay on a banquet for the 28-spotted ladybird.

      Reply

  3. MrsYub
    Oct 09, 2012 @ 08:22:47

    We are fortunate to seem to only have the red ladybird here, and even her we do not see very often. Don’t ya just wish sometimes we could set up a perimiter around the garden that bugs and crawlies have to flash their ID at to enter? If you are up to no good, you don’t get in!

    Reply

  4. notjustgreenfingers
    Oct 09, 2012 @ 15:44:02

    Hi Jean. I’m glad we don’t have your 28 spotted ladybird here in the Uk, though if it’s hardy enough i’m sure oneday it will find it’s way over here.
    We do now have the Harlequin Ladybird which unfortunately is destroying the native ladybird species here in the UK which is a shame and it seems there is nothing that can be done about this at the moment.
    I love ladybirds

    Reply

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