Pouring down and potting up at the allotment

After a dry spell we had a wonderful downpour at the allotment yesterday. It seems to me that one good drenching of rain will do more good in the garden than a couple of weeks of hand watering.

I have been potting up cuttings this week for the Morningside Fair being held on Sunday 29th July. Beelarong Community Farm where I keep my allotment has a stall there to promote the farm and to raise funds too. We sell plants that we raise ourselves and jams made from the fruit grown at the farm. Committee member Di works tirelessly to make this stall a success. I will be writing more about the Fair nearer to the time.

When I was at the allotment on Wednesday I pulled out a large Rosemary bush that was getting very woody making it hard to snip off pieces for my culinary needs, and taking up far too much room. So I am using the bush to start up new plants, one for myself and the rest for the Morningside Fair. This is one of them, looking pretty strong.

Rosemary cutting

Today I’m going to tackle the Brazilian Spinach. I grew this plant from a tiny cutting given to me by Lissa at our local Seed Savers meeting. But that too has rather taken over my tiny plot so I will be taking lots of cuttings from it.

This was the original plant after just a few weeks.

Brazilian Spinach

Now it’s like this – growing vigorously in a corner of my allotment, and I’ve been picking at it constantly.

Brazilian Spinach

I’ll pot up some cuttings for the Fair, but I also want to pot one up for Tatiana who leads our gardening group at New Farm Library. Brazilian Spinach grows vigorously in the sub-tropics where I live, but it seems to be one of those plants that you don’t see in nurseries. So there is a bit of an ‘underground movement’ in Brisbane to ensure it’s survival as we pass around snippets of the stuff.

Talking about survival.  Will you just look at this.  I will never understand Mother Nature. I planted lettuce seeds in the best potting mix weeks ago and after much cosseting up popped these tiny seedlings. (Look hard – they are there!)

Cos lettuce seedlings

Put that alongside this testosterone fuelled plant that is growing valiantly out of a dry brick wall outside my garage.

Happy gardening.

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6 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. narf7
    May 26, 2012 @ 23:23:57

    What a lovely blog! I just stumbled over you when hunting for something online and just added you to my rss feed reader so that I can read about your wonderful garden early in the morning over my first cup of tea. 🙂

    Reply

    • Allotment adventures with Jean
      May 27, 2012 @ 07:21:09

      Thank you for visiting my blog, and for your lovely comment. I have been searching – do you have a blog? Best wishes from Jean.

      Reply

      • narf7
        May 28, 2012 @ 07:32:29

        Yes I do Jean, I live in Tasmania with my husband Steve and my blog is called theroadtoserendipity . I found your blog from a comment that you made on someone elses blog and couldn’t wait to read your delightful blog. We are trying to turn our 4 acre property into a sustainable food forest. We inherited the property from my dad when he died and now we are having to put our horticultural ‘money’ where our mouths are! We live on a very tight budget by choice and want to barter, grow and create as much of what we need as possible. In saying this, we are NOT crazy whacked out hippies, we are urbanites who want to do what they can to learn from the past to make a better future for our kids. I am very interesed in your situation. Do you have an allotment on a farm? I have just read a book called “The Dirty Life” about a woman who married a farmer in the USA…but its like NOTHING we poor Aussies have to deal with! Your in the sub tropics and we are in a cool temperate zone here. You guys are SOOO lucky to be able to get pretty much any plant that you want in Queensland. We have enormous troubles getting plants here and I doubt we will ever see Brazillean spinach down here (even if it croaks in the frost…I would at least like the CHANCE to grow it! ;)). I signed up to read your blog because I felt a communal spirit with you that gardeners get with each other. It doesn’t matter that we might not ever meet, it doesn’t matter who we are or what we like, the gardening bug has us firmly in its grip and we are its endentured slaves from now on so its nice to meet up with a fellow slave 🙂 Have a fantastic day and hopefully you find Serendipity Farm and drop in for a cup of tea and a home baked scone on our wood burning stove as its VERY cold in Tasmania today 🙂

  2. Allotment adventures with Jean
    May 28, 2012 @ 10:46:13

    Thank you for your comment and pointing me towards your own blog. I found it and enjoyed reading it. In answer to your question, yes, my allotment is part of Beelarong Community Farm. The land is leased from Brisbane City Council. The centre of the farm is given over to the community market garden where volunteers can work and share the harvest at the end of the morning’s labour. The community garden is surrounded by small allotments. Each plot is approximately 8 square metres. It is always interesting to see the variety of veggies that allotment holders grow on their little bit of land. There is a great community atmosphere at the farm, especially on a Wednesday morning when volunteers and allotment holders get together to work and to share a morning tea under the shaded area beside the main shed.

    Reply

  3. lightlycrunchy
    Jun 02, 2012 @ 09:53:36

    What a pretty looking variety of spinach – Id never heard of it before. Its one of my favourite things – and I just discovered that we forgot to purchase seeds for it and didnt plant any! I’ll have to pick up a few packets this weekend and get seeding.

    Reply

  4. Allotment adventures with Jean
    Jun 02, 2012 @ 10:22:42

    Thank you for your two comments today.
    Brazilian spinach is a tropical/sub-tropical variety so may not be available in your climate. You might however be interested to read more about it in “Tropical Cuisine – Cooking in Clare’s kitchen”. Here is the link http://tropicalcuisine.com/2011/01/08/brazilian-spinach-where-to-get-it/

    Reply

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